Poet Hafez

Persian lyric poet Hafiz
(born Khwāja Šamsu d-Dīn Muḥammad Hāfez-e Šīrāzī)
grew up in Shiraz.
Very little is known about his life,
but
it is thought that he may have memorized the holy Qur’an
after hearing his father recite passages.
When his father died, he left school to work at a bakery and as a copyist.
Hafiz became a poet at the court of Abu Ishak
and
also taught at a religious college.
He is one of the most celebrated of the Persian poets,
and
his influence can be felt to this day.
As the author of numerous ghazals expressing love, spirituality, and protest,
he and his work continue to be important to Iranians,
and
many of his poems are used as proverbs or sayings.
 
Hafiz’s tomb is in Musalla Gardens in Shiraz.

حافظ Khwāja Šams ud-Dīn Muhammad Hāfez-e Šīrāzī, or simply Hāfez (Persian: خواجه شمس‌الدین محمد حافظ شیرازی), was a Persian mystic and poet. He was born sometime between the years 1310 and 1337.  one of the three greatest poets of the world. His lyrical poems, known as ghazals, are noted for their beauty and bring to fruition the love, mysticism, and early Sufi themes

― شمس الدین محمد حافظ /
Shams-al-Din Mohammad Hafez,
(1325 – 1389 )

Image and text credits : https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/hafez#poet

Returning


The morning breeze comes back 
and from the southern desert 
the lapwing returns 
The dove’s soft song about roses 
I hear that again. 

The tulip, who understands what the lily says, 
went away, but now she’s back. 

With the sound of a bell, 
strength and gentleness. 

Hafiz broke his vow and damaged his heart, 
but now, for no reason, his Friend forgives that, 
and turns, and walks back up to his door.

حافظ Khwāja Šams ud-Dīn Muhammad Hāfez-e Šīrāzī, or simply Hāfez (Persian: خواجه شمس‌الدین محمد حافظ شیرازی), was a Persian mystic and poet. He was born sometime between the years 1310 and 1337.  one of the three greatest poets of the world. His lyrical poems, known as ghazals, are noted for their beauty and bring to fruition the love, mysticism, and early Sufi themes

― شمس الدین محمد حافظ /
Shams-al-Din Mohammad Hafez,
(1325 – 1389 )

Translator:

Barks, C. (1993).  The hand of poetry. New Lebanon: Omega Publications


Fair Wind, Be Kind

Fair wind, be kind –
Tell that lovely gazelle who it was
That made me wander distraught
Across desert sands and mountain cliffs.

The seller of sweets,
May she have long life –
Why is she not generous
To this parrot longing for honey?

Oh flower,
Is it your proud nature
That keeps you aloof
From the bird dancing around you?

nature-29

It is the beauty of one’s nature
That nets the seekers.
Ropes and cages never trap
The wary bird.

How is it that those tall beauties,
With black eyes shining
From faces of moonlike radiance –
Pass me by?

How can your face show such beauty,
While here in Earth
You are the image
Of inconstancy and faithlessness?

Hafiz –
Your sayings draw melodies
From the stars
And set even the son of Mary to dance.

While you keep the company of the enlightened
And quaff the mystic wine,
Forget not those, who sail upon the heavens
As birds glide upon the wind.

― شمس الدین محمد حافظ /
Shams-al-Din Mohammad Hafez,
(1325 – 1389 )

From: The Diwan of Hafiz Shirazi,

Witness of illusions

نوبهار است در آن کوش که خوشدل باشی
کـه بسی گل بدمد باز و تو در گل باشی
من نگویم که کنون با که نشین و چه بنوش
کـه تو خود دانی اگر زیرک و عاقل باشی
چنـگ در پرده همین می‌دهدت پند ولی
وعظـت آن گاه کند سود که قابل باشی
در چمن هر ورقی دفتر حالی دگر اسـت
حیف باشد که ز کار همـه غافـل باشی
نـقد عـمرت بـبرد غصه دنیا به گزاف
گر شب و روز در این قصه مشکـل باشی
گر چه راهیست پر از بیم ز ما تا بر دوست
رفـتـن آسان بود ار واقف مـنزل باشی
حافـظا گر مدد از بخت بـلـندت باشد
صید آن شاهد مطـبوع شـمایل باشی

― شمس الدین محمد حافظ /
Shams-al-Din Mohammad Hafez,
(1325 – 1389 )

In the spring, open your heart to joyous infusions
Like flowers open up, or stay in muddy collusions.

I cannot tell you to befriend this, or drink that
Wit and wisdom display your own solutions.

Strings of the harp sing out the same advice
When worthy, you will reach your conclusions.

Each blade of grass speaks of its life’s tale
Alas if self-absorbed you’re free from inclusions.

Worry not, else you will lose your precious now
If stuck in day’s and night’s revolutions.

Though fears are strewn upon the path of Love
Pass easy if free from destination’s confusions.

O Hafiz, if fortune upon you smiles
Become prey to that Witness of illusions.

© Shahriar Shahriari
Los Angeles, Ca
October 16, 1999

I Know the Way You Can Get

I know the way you can get
When you have not had a drink of Love:
Your face hardens,
Your sweet muscles cramp.
Children become concerned
About a strange look that appears in your eyes
Which even begins to worry your own mirror
And nose.

Squirrels and birds sense your sadness
And call an important conference in a tall tree.
They decide which secret code to chant
To help your mind and soul.

Even angels fear that brand of madness
That arrays itself against the world
And throws sharp stones and spears into
The innocent
And into one’s self
O I know the way you can get
If you have not been out drinking Love:

You might rip apart
Every sentence your friends and teachers say,
Looking for hidden clauses.
You might weigh every word on a scale
Like a dead fish.

You might pull out a ruler to measure
From every angle in your darkness
The beautiful dimensions of a heart you once
Trusted.

I know the way you can get
If you have not had a drink from Love’s
Hands.
That is why all the Great Ones speak of
The vital need
To keep Remembering God,
So you will come to know and see Him
As being so Playful
And Wanting,
Just Wanting to help.

That is why Hafiz says:
Bring your cup near me,
For I am a Sweet Old Vagabond
With an Infinite Leaking Barrel
Of Light and Laughter and Truth
That the Beloved has tied to my back.
Dear one,
Indeed, please bring your heart near me.
For all I care about
Is quenching your thirst for freedom!
All a Sane man can ever care about
Is giving Love!

― شمس الدین محمد حافظ /
Shams-al-Din Mohammad Hafez,
(1325 – 1389 )